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Published yearly: 

4 Issues

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ISSN: 2320-964X (Online) 

ISSN: 2320-7817  (Print)

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RESEARCH ARTICLE

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Int. Journal of Life Sciences, 2018; 6(2): 517-522      |                 Available online, April 26, 2018

AM Fungal Diversity in selected medicinal trees of Sanjay Gandhi National Park, Borivali, Mumbai, India 

Sunita Chahar* and Shweta Belose

 

NES Ratnam College of Arts, Science and Commerce, Bhandup(West), Mumbai, India

*Corresponding author: sunitadchahar@gmail.com

Received : 06.03.2018  |  Revised : 15.04.2018 |   Accepted : 23.04.2018   |  Published : 26.04.2018

The AM fungal composition, diversity & distribution was studied in five trees (Sapindus trifoliatus, Psidium gujava, Citrus limonia, Aegle marmelos and Bauhinia variegata) of medicinal importance from Thane region of Sanjay Gandhi National Park, Mumbai, India.  AM colonization ranged from 75% to 85%. AM spore density ranged from 58±5 to 75± 7 in the rhizospheric soils. Based on morphological characters 24 Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal species belonging to five genera were isolated and identified. Out of the five trees,Citrus limonia showed maximum species richness followed by  Bauhinia variegata and Aegle marmelos.  The isolation frequency of Acaulospora and Glomus was 100%. Ambispora and Scutellospora were less frequently found.

 

Key words:  AM Fungi, Sanjay Gandhi National Park, Glomus, Acaulospora, Gigaspora.

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Editor: Dr.Arvind Chavhan

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Cite this article as:

Chahar Sunita and Belose Shweta (2018) AM Fungal Diversity in selected medicinal trees of Sanjay Gandhi National Park, Borivali, Mumbai, India, Int. J. of. Life Sciences, Volume 6(2): 517-522. 

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Acknowledgement

I thank University Grants Commission, Western Region, Pune, India for providing the financial support. I also thank the College for providing the laboratory facilities.

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Conflicts of interest: The authors stated that no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright: © 2018 | Author(s), This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial - No Derives License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.

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Websites:

www.invam.caf.wvu.edu.      

www.zor.zut.edu.

 

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    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF

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    Origin & Evolution

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